Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15423
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dc.contributor.authorCanhoto, AI-
dc.contributor.authorvom Lehn, D-
dc.contributor.authorKerrigan, F-
dc.contributor.authorYalkin, C-
dc.contributor.authorBraun, M-
dc.contributor.authorSteinmetz, N-
dc.contributor.editorNisar, T-
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-14T13:08:35Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-31-
dc.date.available2017-11-14T13:08:35Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationCogent Business & Management, 2015, 2 (1)en_US
dc.identifier.issn2331-1975-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15423-
dc.description.abstractSocial media content can spread quickly, particularly that generated by users themselves. This is a problem for businesses as user-generated content (UGC) often portrays brands negatively and, when mishandled, may turn into a crisis. This paper presents a framework for crisis management that incorporates insights from research on social media users’ behaviour. It looks beyond specific platforms and tools, to develop general principles for communicating with social media users. The framework’s relevance is illustrated via a widely publicised case of detrimental UGC. The paper proposes that, today, businesses need to identify relevant social media platforms, to monitor sentiment variances, and to go beyond simplistic metrics with content analysis. They also need to engage with online communities and the new influencers, and to respond quickly in a manner that is congruent with said social media platforms and their users’ expectations. The paper extends the theoretical understanding of crisis management to consider the role of social media as both a cause and a solution to those crises. Moreover, it bridges information management theory and practice, providing practical managerial guidance on how to monitor and respond to social media content, particularly during fast-evolving crises.en_US
dc.language.isoesen_US
dc.titleFall and redemption: Monitoring and engaging in social media conversations during a crisisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311975.2015.1084978-
dc.relation.isPartOfCogent Business & Management-
pubs.issue1-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
pubs.volume2-
Appears in Collections:Dept of Social Sciences Media and Communications Research Papers



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